Tim Cook:U.S. Government Asking For Something We Do Not Have

Apple CEO Tim Cook, in a letter to Apple customers,said the Tech Company will not use the backdoor by "Building a version of iOS that bypasses security". 
Apple on Tuesday, was ordered by a judge in California to help the FBI break into the phone of one of the San Bernardino shooters.
The iPhone 5s which belong to Syed Farook, who in December last year, along with his wife carried out a mass shooting during a training event where he worked, killing 14 people in Department of Public Health, San Bernardino, California. The couple was later killed in a shootout with police.
here Tim cook's Letter.
We have great respect, for the professionals at the FBI, and we believe their intentions are good. Up to this point, we have done everything that is both within our power and within the law to help them. But now the U.S. government has asked us for something we simply do not have, and something we consider too dangerous to create. They have asked us to build a backdoor to the iPhone.
Specifically, the FBI wants us to make a new version of the iPhone operating system, circumventing several important security features, and install it on an iPhone recovered during the investigation. In the wrong hands, this software — which does not exist today — would have the potential to unlock any iPhone in someone’s physical possession.
The FBI may use different words to describe this tool, but make no mistake: Building a version of iOS that bypasses security in this way would undeniably create a backdoor. And while the government may argue that its use would be limited to this case, there is no way to guarantee such control.
The government would have us remove security features and add new capabilities to the operating system, allowing a passcode to be input electronically. This would make it easier to unlock an iPhone by “brute force,” trying thousands or millions of combinations with the speed of a modern computer.
The implications of the government’s demands are chilling. If the government can use the All Writs Act to make it easier to unlock your iPhone, it would have the power to reach into anyone’s device to capture their data. The government could extend this breach of privacy and demand that Apple build surveillance software to intercept your messages, access your health records or financial data, track your location, or even access your phone’s microphone or camera without your knowledge.
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